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LAMB ANNOUNCES PA TO RECEIVE $1.6 BILLION TO FIX BRIDGES UNDER THE BIPARTISAN INFRASTRUCTURE LAW

January 14, 2022

(PITTSBURGH, PA) – Today, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) launched the largest Bridge Formula Program in American history, made possible by the passage of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.  Representative Conor Lamb (PA-17), whose Support for Community Bridges Act legislation was included in the final language of the infrastructure bill, announced that Pennsylvania will receive a total of $1.6 billion over the next five years, with $327.2 million being designated for the program in Fiscal Year 2022

“Western Pennsylvania is home to hundreds of bridges that are in desperate need of repair,” said Lamb.  “This historic federal funding – passed with bipartisan support – will ensure that we are able to invest in these critical transportation connections in communities across our region and create good, union jobs for construction and trades workers.”

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, Pennsylvania has 3,353 structurally deficient bridges across the state.  The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave Pennsylvania's bridges a D+ grade in its most recent Infrastructure Report Card.

The Bridge Formula Program under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law represents the largest investment ever made in fixing the nation’s bridges, dedicating a total of $26.5 billion to states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico over the next five years.  The FHWA guidance issued today also encourages states to direct increased funds to off-system bridges owned by a county, city, town or other local agency and that federal funds can be used for 100% of the cost of repairing or rehabilitating such locally owned off-system bridges with no local or state funding match requirement.

 Click here for more details on how the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will deliver for Pennsylvania, and click here to see a map of bridges in poor repair and in need of funding.

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Issues:Economy